Handicapping IMpassion130

A couple of weeks ago, Genentech announced that interim data were forthcoming (ESMO? SABCS seems a long way off) from IMpassion130, their P3, 900-subject, 1:1 randomized atezo + Abraxane v. placebo + Abraxane study in first-line, triple-negative metastatic breast cancer. To tide us over, they offered up a teaser: the study met its co-primary PFS endpoint in the intent-to-treat and PD-L1+ populations, and the company reported a positive trend in OS in the PD-L1+ population. The language was not subtle. In addition to touting 130 as the “first positive Phase III immunotherapy study in triple negative breast cancer,” Genentech said they were going to “submit to authorities globally with the aim of bringing this combination to people with triple negative breast cancer as soon as possible.”

What kind of data might be backing this up? Merck were slow to combine pembro and chemotherapy, so we don’t have a lot of context for what successful immunotherapy looks like in metastatic TNBC. But let’s mine abstract libraries past for details anyway. Continue reading “Handicapping IMpassion130”

Seattle Genetics Bags Irinotec- Er, IMMU-132

Two billion dollars seems spendy for a repackaged chemo agent that has been on the market since 1996. It’s no secret, either; irinotecan is standard of care in colon and lung, though, weirdly, it doesn’t get prescribed a lot in breast (despite the fact that irinotecan targets TOP-1, which is commonly overexpressed in breast).

What Seattle Genetics may be banking on is the branding; this is a “new drug” for triple negative breast cancer, which is great marketing when, in reality, there is no drug that is for TNBC. Continue reading “Seattle Genetics Bags Irinotec- Er, IMMU-132”