Immunomedics’ P3 Halted for Efficacy

After a slow-enrolling trial, a failed acquisition, an FDA Complete Response Letter, years of unspecified manufacturing issues and about eleven different management teams, Immunomedics finally had some good news last week: their phase 3 ASCENT trial was halted for efficacy. Wait, not just efficacy, compelling efficacy. (That’s a new one for me.) And since Immunomedics’ leadership roles are rented, not owned, there was naturally a concurrent announcement that they’ve appointed a new CEO.

The 529 subjects enrolled in ASCENT were randomized 1:1 to receive either sacituzumab (a TROP-2-directed ADC with an irinotecan metabolite payload) or standard of care chemo. Patients had to have had at least two prior lines of therapy in the metastatic setting, including a taxane, so the single-agent chemo options allowed by the trial are not particularly exciting and set sacituzumab up well on the efficacy endpoints: eribulin, capecitabine, gemcitabine, or vinorelbine. The primary endpoint is PFS, with secondary endpoints including OS and duration of response.

I do think sacituzumab will be approved under its current accelerated designation, which means the full analyses will have to be delivered at some point. A full approval could still be a year out, but I don’t think that’s the only reason behind what I expect to be a lack of fanfare come PDUFA day in June. This drug just isn’t going to be a blockbuster. It addresses a small market (TNBC patients number about 10-15% of the breast cancer population), and this “targeted” therapy brings with it some heinous toxicities that remind us it’s closer to a chemo reformulation than a Kadcyla, which I know has lost its luster but really felt like a game-changer circa 2010. And while a Kadcyla comparison isn’t apples-to-apples, as it’s HER2+ targeted and addresses a larger, likely healthier market, we’ll reference it here because, practically, there aren’t that many other ADCs kicking around to reference.

One of the benefits of ADCs is you take a supremely toxic payload and, by targeting it to a protein, minimize the adverse events and make the drug tolerable. Kadcyla did this with maytansine, which is a tubulin binder with side effects too severe to be clinically useful. Link it to Herceptin, and poof! Problem solved. 

Even with the TROP-2 “targeting”, which I’ve always found suspect given the high reported AE rates (TROP-2 is thought to be expressed in many solid tumors but only minimally in normal tissue – so is the issue the antibody or the linker?), sacituzumab is a difficult drug to tolerate. In the phase 1/2 study, 41% of subjects experienced adverse events of grade 3 or higher, with 39% experiencing grade 3 or higher neutropenia. It did knock diarrhea, which is the biggest issue with irinotecan, down to 59% overall and 13% grade 3 or higher, which is … better. On the less deadly side, about half of patients lost their hair. Targeted, you say? EMILIA, Kadcyla’s P3, demonstrated a serious adverse event rate of 18%. That’s what an ADC can do. That’s how you improve quality, not just quantity, of life. Anyone can go on, and likely stay on, Kadcyla with a minimum of surveillance and intervention, though, in general, HER2+ patients are easier to manage and are more likely to be healthier at baseline. That’s what TNBC needs and what immunotherapy is trying to deliver, however modest the results have been so far. There are a lot of drugs out there, so when do we get quality and not just “options”?  

In fairness, sacituzumab rates as an option. Immunomedics has been parading the early efficacy data around for so long that I nearly have it memorized: it’s about a 30% response rate and 6 months of PFS, right? That kind of response rate is good in TNBC; I’d expect standard of care to be 15-20%, worse as you move further away from first-line treatment, and PFS to be closer to 4 months. As for how that predicts the outcome of the study and the FDA decision, the AEs will be worse in the treatment group, but it’s going to get approved. The question is what kind of market is waiting for it. We haven’t seen much excitement from anyone not on Immunomedics’ payroll, but we know that at least as of 2017, Seattle Genetics was … less than enthused with their antics. I’m with Seattle. TNBC is a truly underserved population that needs better, but this drug has real limits.

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